Friday, December 24, 2010

Marc Faber The entire energy sector including natural gas is probably relatively attractive

Marc Faber : the demand for oil will go up

Marc Faber :" The entire energy sector including natural gas is probably relatively attractive because the global economy could surprise on the upside. In other words, the EMs continue to grow and the oil demand continues to grow, especially out of China and India. The Europe and US stabilizes and also recovers somewhat, in which case the demand for oil will go up and drive up prices."
via www.moneycontrol.com Dec 10, 2010

How to Cure Inflation Featuring Milton Friedman

How to Cure Inflation Featuring Milton Friedman


Milton Friedman Biography from Wikipedia :
Milton Friedman (July 31, 1912 – November 16, 2006) was an American economist, statistician, a professor at the University of Chicago, and the recipient of the Nobel Prize in Economics. Among scholars, he is best known for his theoretical and empirical research, especially consumption analysis, monetary history and theory, and for his demonstration of the complexity of stabilization policy.[1] He was an economic advisor to U.S. President Ronald Reagan. Over time, many governments practiced his restatement of a political philosophy that extolled the virtues of a free market economic system with little intervention by government. As a leader of the Chicago school of economics, based at the University of Chicago, he had great influence in determining the research agenda of the entire profession. Milton Friedman's works, which include many monographs, books, scholarly articles, papers, magazine columns, television programs, videos, and lectures, cover a broad range of topics of microeconomics, macroeconomics, economic history, and public policy issues. The Economist described him as "the most influential economist of the second half of the 20th century…possibly of all of it".

Joseph Stiglitz : The Future of Capitalism

Speaker: Professor Joseph Stiglitz
Chair: Professor David Held ,This event was recorded on 8 February 2010 in Peacock Theatre, Portugal Street ,Stiglitz lays out not only the course of the financial crisis which began in 2007, but its underlying causes, and shows why much more radical reforms are needed than are currently being contemplated if we are to avoid similar 'systemic' crises in the future. Showing why the bailout has been only marginally effective and how it could have been much more so, and outlines the enormous opportunity - not yet taken - to design a new global financial architecture.

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